File your Taxes for Free!
  • Get your maximum refund*
  • 100% accurate calculations guaranteed*

TurboTax Federal Free Edition - File Taxes Online

Don't let filing your taxes get you down! We'll help make it as easy as possible. With e-file and direct deposit, there's no faster way to get your refund!

Approved TurboTax Affiliate Site. TurboTax and TurboTax Online, among others, are registered trademarks and/or service marks of Intuit Inc. in the United States and other countries. Other parties' trademarks or service marks are the property of the respective owners.


© 2012 - 2018 All rights reserved.

This is an Approved TurboTax Affiliate site. TurboTax and TurboTax Online, among other are registered trademarks and/or service marks of Intuit, Inc. in the United States and other countries. Other parties' trademarks or service marks are the property of the respective owners.
When discussing "Free e-file", note that state e-file is an additional fee. E-file fees do not apply to New York state returns. Prices are subject to change without notice. E-file and get your refund faster
*If you pay an IRS or state penalty or interest because of a TurboTax calculations error, we'll pay you the penalty and interest.
*Maximum Refund Guarantee - or Your Money Back: If you get a larger refund or smaller tax due from another tax preparation method, we'll refund the applicable TurboTax federal and/or state purchase price paid. TurboTax Federal Free Edition customers are entitled to payment of $14.99 and a refund of your state purchase price paid. Claims must be submitted within sixty (60) days of your TurboTax filing date and no later than 6/15/14. E-file, Audit Defense, Professional Review, Refund Transfer and technical support fees are excluded. This guarantee cannot be combined with the TurboTax Satisfaction (Easy) Guarantee. *We're so confident your return will be done right, we guarantee it. Accurate calculations guaranteed. If you pay an IRS or state penalty or interest because of a TurboTax calculations error, we'll pay you the penalty and interest.
https://turbotax.intuit.com/corp/guarantees.jsp

State Tax Returns

How To Amend 2012 Tax ReturnHow Can I File 2010 Taxes1041 Ez FormHttp Www Hrblock ComHow To Do 2012 TaxesIrs 1040x Amended Return2012 1040 EzFile Previous Years Taxes1040nr OnlineIrs Tax Forms 2011Filing A 1040xFile 2012 Tax Return OnlineFile Your State Taxes Free2012 1040 Tax Forms2011 Income Tax Forms 1040ezIs There A Way To File State Taxes For FreeIl 1040xFree State Income Tax FormFree State Tax PreparationIrs Form 1040 VTax PreparationTax AmendedTurbo Tax 1040x1040x Online Form1040x Amendment FormIrs Form 1040x 2014Irs Extension1040ez Tax FormsHow To Amend Taxes Online1040-xFree Tax Extension FilingFilelate ComHow Do College Students File TaxesFile 2007 Tax Return1040 X Tax FormWww Myfreetaxes Com SwfloridaHow To File Amended Tax Return TurbotaxFile 2008 TaxesFile Free State And Federal Taxes OnlineEzform

State Tax Returns

State tax returns Publication 544 - Introductory Material Table of Contents Future Developments What's New Important Reminders IntroductionOrdering forms and publications. State tax returns Tax questions. State tax returns Future Developments For the latest information about developments related to Publication 544, such as legislation enacted after it was published, go to www. State tax returns irs. State tax returns gov/pub544. State tax returns What's New Direct reporting on Schedule D. State tax returns   For 2013, certain transactions may be combined and the totals reported directly on Schedule D. State tax returns If you choose to do that, you do not need to include these transactions on Form 8949, Sales and Other Dispositions of Capital Assets. State tax returns For additional information, see Schedule D and Form 8949 in chapter 4. State tax returns Tax rate on net capital gain and qualified dividends. State tax returns   The maximum tax rate of 15% on net capital gain and qualified dividends has increased to 20% for some taxpayers. State tax returns See Capital Gains Tax Rates in chapter 4. State tax returns Important Reminders Dispositions of U. State tax returns S. State tax returns real property interests by foreign persons. State tax returns  If you are a foreign person or firm and you sell or otherwise dispose of a U. State tax returns S. State tax returns real property interest, the buyer (or other transferee) may have to withhold income tax on the amount you receive for the property (including cash, the fair market value of other property, and any assumed liability). State tax returns Corporations, partnerships, trusts, and estates also may have to withhold on certain U. State tax returns S. State tax returns real property interests they distribute to you. State tax returns You must report these dispositions and distributions and any income tax withheld on your U. State tax returns S. State tax returns income tax return. State tax returns For more information on dispositions of U. State tax returns S. State tax returns real property interests, see Publication 519, U. State tax returns S. State tax returns Tax Guide for Aliens. State tax returns Also see Publication 515, Withholding of Tax on Nonresident Aliens and Foreign Entities. State tax returns Foreign source income. State tax returns  If you are a U. State tax returns S. State tax returns citizen with income from dispositions of property outside the United States (foreign income), you must report all such income on your tax return unless it is exempt from U. State tax returns S. State tax returns law. State tax returns This is true whether you reside inside or outside the United States and whether or not you receive a Form 1099 from the foreign payor. State tax returns Photographs of missing children. State tax returns  The Internal Revenue Service is a proud partner with the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children. State tax returns Photographs of missing children selected by the Center may appear in this publication on pages that would otherwise be blank. State tax returns You can help bring these children home by looking at the photographs and calling 1-800-THE-LOST (1-800-843-5678) if you recognize a child. State tax returns Introduction You dispose of property when any of the following occurs. State tax returns You sell property. State tax returns You exchange property for other property. State tax returns Your property is condemned or disposed of under threat of condemnation. State tax returns Your property is repossessed. State tax returns You abandon property. State tax returns You give property away. State tax returns This publication explains the tax rules that apply when you dispose of property. State tax returns It discusses the following topics. State tax returns How to figure a gain or loss. State tax returns Whether your gain or loss is ordinary or capital. State tax returns How to treat your gain or loss when you dispose of business property. State tax returns How to report a gain or loss. State tax returns This publication also explains whether your gain is taxable or your loss is deductible. State tax returns This publication does not discuss certain transactions covered in other IRS publications. State tax returns These include the following. State tax returns Most transactions involving stocks, bonds, options, forward and futures contracts, and similar investments. State tax returns See chapter 4 of Publication 550, Investment Income and Expenses. State tax returns Sale of your main home. State tax returns See Publication 523, Selling Your Home. State tax returns Installment sales. State tax returns See Publication 537, Installment Sales. State tax returns Transfers of property at death. State tax returns See Publication 559, Survivors, Executors, and Administrators. State tax returns Forms to file. State tax returns   When you dispose of property, you usually will have to file one or more of the following forms. State tax returns Schedule D, Capital Gains and Losses. State tax returns Form 4797, Sales of Business Property. State tax returns Form 8824, Like-Kind Exchanges. State tax returns Form 8949, Sales and Other Dispositions of Capital Assets. State tax returns    Although the discussions in this publication may at times refer mainly to individuals, many of the rules discussed also apply to taxpayers other than individuals. State tax returns However, the rules for property held for personal use usually will not apply to taxpayers other than individuals. State tax returns Comments and suggestions. State tax returns   We welcome your comments about this publication and your suggestions for future editions. State tax returns   You can send your comments to the following address. State tax returns Internal Revenue Service Tax Forms and Publications Division 1111 Constitution Ave. State tax returns NW, IR-6526 Washington, DC 20224   We respond to many letters by telephone. State tax returns Therefore, it would be helpful if you would include your daytime phone number, including the area code, in your correspondence. State tax returns You can also send us comments from www. State tax returns irs. State tax returns gov/formspubs/. State tax returns Click on “More Information ” and then on “Give us feedback. State tax returns ” Although we cannot respond individually to each email, we do appreciate your feedback and will consider your comments as we revise our tax products. State tax returns Ordering forms and publications. State tax returns   Visit www. State tax returns irs. State tax returns gov/formspubs/ to download forms and publications, call 1-800-TAX-FORM (1-800-829-3676), or write to the address below and receive a response within 10 days after your request is received. State tax returns Internal Revenue Service 1201 N. State tax returns Mitsubishi Motorway Bloomington, IL 61705-6613 Tax questions. State tax returns   If you have a tax question, check the information available on IRS. State tax returns gov or call 1-800-829-1040. State tax returns We cannot answer tax questions sent to either of the above addresses. State tax returns Prev  Up  Next   Home   More Online Publications
Print - Click this link to Print this page

Tax Information for Members of the U.S. Armed Forces

For federal tax purposes, the U.S. Armed Forces includes officers and enlisted personnel in all regular and reserve units controlled by the Secretaries of Defense, the Army, Navy and Air Force. The Coast Guard is also included, but not the U.S. Merchant Marine or the American Red Cross. However, these and other support personnel may qualify for certain tax deadline extensions because of their service in a combat zone.

IRS YouTube Video
Combat Pay:
English | Spanish
Military Tax Tips: English | Spanish | ASL


Consumer Alert

June 2012

Taxpayers should be on the lookout for a new, email-based phishing scam now circulating that targets Department of Defense military members, retirees and civilian employees. The email appears to come from Defense Finance and Accounting Services and displays a .mil email address. The email states that those receiving disability compensation from the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) may be able to obtain additional funds from the IRS. Email recipients are then asked to send various VA and IRS documents containing their personal and financial information, such as copies of VA award letters or their income tax returns, to an address in Florida.

The information on these documents is then used by the scammers to commit identity theft. Typically, identity thieves use someone’s personal data to empty the victim’s financial accounts, run up charges on the victim’s existing credit cards or apply for new loans, credit cards, services or benefits in the victim’s name.

For more information on phishing scams, please see Suspicious e-Mails and Identity Theft.


Tax Laws Affecting the Military

These tax laws provide some special benefits for active members of the U.S. Armed Forces, including those serving in combat zones.


Combat Zones


Publications

  • Publication 3, Armed Forces' Tax Guide, addresses a wide range of issues that may affect members of the military:
    • Online — browse the publication to find specific information;
    • Portable Document Format (PDF) — download a copy to read later or print select pages;
    • Hardcopy — order a paper copy by calling 1-800-829-3676. 


News Releases (IR) and Fact Sheets (FS) 

  • IR-2010-47 — Haiti Relief Workers Qualify for Combat Zone Extension; Military Personnel and Designated Civilians Have at Least 180 Days to File and Pay
  • IR-2007-46 — Free Online Tax Filing Available to Many Military Members
  • IR-2006-152 — Active Duty Reservists Get Relief on Retirement Plan Payments; Refunds of 10-Percent Tax Available Back to 2001, New Law Says
  • IR-2006-129 — New Law Expands IRA Options for Military; Many Can Still Contribute for 2004 and 2005
  • IR-2003-132 — IRS Helps Military Personnel Get New Law's Tax Breaks
  • IR-2003-63 — New Tax Scam Targets Families of Armed Forces Members
  • IR-2003-43 — Tax Assistance for Military Families; IRS.gov Page for Armed Forces
  • FS-2003-11 — Information for Taxpayers Serving in the Armed Forces
  • IR-2002-18 — Tax Relief for Troops in the Afghanistan Combat Zone.


Legal Guidance

  • Revenue Ruling 2009-11 — Differential Wage Payments to Active Duty Members of the Uniformed Services
  • Notice 2003-21 — Tax Relief for Those Involved in Operation Iraqi Freedom.
  • Notice 2002-17 — Tax Relief for Those Involved in Operation Enduring Freedom.


Related Items:

Page Last Reviewed or Updated: 04-Sep-2013

The State Tax Returns

State tax returns 3. State tax returns   Abandonments Table of Contents You abandon property when you voluntarily and permanently give up possession and use of the property with the intention of ending your ownership but without passing it on to anyone else. State tax returns Whether an abandonment has occurred is determined in light of all the facts and circumstances. State tax returns You must both show an intention to abandon the property and affirmatively act to abandon the property. State tax returns A voluntary conveyance of the property in lieu of foreclosure is not an abandonment and is treated as the exchange of property to satisfy a debt. State tax returns For more information, see Sales and Exchanges in Publication 544. State tax returns The tax consequences of abandonment of property that secures a debt depend on whether you were personally liable for the debt (recourse debt) or were not personally liable for the debt (nonrecourse debt). State tax returns See Publication 544 if you abandoned property that did not secure debt. State tax returns This publication only discusses the tax consequences of abandoning property that secured a debt. State tax returns Abandonment of property securing recourse debt. State tax returns    In most cases, if you abandon property that secures debt for which you are personally liable (recourse debt), you do not have gain or loss until the later foreclosure is completed. State tax returns For details on figuring gain or loss on the foreclosure, see chapter 2. State tax returns Example 1—abandonment of personal-use property securing recourse debt. State tax returns In 2009, Anne purchased a home for $200,000. State tax returns She borrowed the entire purchase price, for which she was personally liable, and gave the bank a mortgage on the home. State tax returns In 2013, Anne lost her job and was unable to continue making her mortgage loan payments. State tax returns Because her mortgage loan balance was $185,000 and the FMV of her home was only $150,000, Anne decided to abandon her home by permanently moving out on August 1, 2013. State tax returns Because Anne was personally liable for the debt and the bank did not complete a foreclosure of the property in 2013, Anne has neither gain nor loss in tax year 2013 from abandoning the home. State tax returns If the bank sells the house at a foreclosure sale in 2014, Anne will have to figure her gain or nondeductible loss for tax year 2014 as discussed earlier in chapter 2. State tax returns Example 2—abandonment of business or investment property securing recourse debt. State tax returns In 2009, Sue purchased business property for $200,000. State tax returns She borrowed the entire purchase price, for which she was personally liable, and gave the lender a security interest in the property. State tax returns In 2013, Sue was unable to continue making her loan payments. State tax returns Because her loan balance was $185,000 and the FMV of the property was only $150,000, Sue abandoned the property on August 1, 2013. State tax returns Because Sue was personally liable for the debt and the lender did not complete a foreclosure of the property in 2013, Sue has neither gain nor loss in tax year 2013 from abandoning the property. State tax returns If the lender sells the property at a foreclosure sale in 2014, Sue will have to figure her gain or deductible loss for tax year 2014 as discussed earlier in chapter 2. State tax returns Abandonment of property securing nonrecourse debt. State tax returns    If you abandon property that secures debt for which you are not personally liable (nonrecourse debt), the abandonment is treated as a sale or exchange. State tax returns   The amount you realize on the abandonment of property that secured nonrecourse debt is the amount of the nonrecourse debt. State tax returns If the amount you realize is more than your adjusted basis, then you have a gain. State tax returns If your adjusted basis is more than the amount you realize, then you have a loss. State tax returns For more information on how to figure gain and loss, see Gain or Loss from Sales or Exchanges in Publication 544. State tax returns   Loss from abandonment of business or investment property is deductible as a loss. State tax returns The character of the loss depends on the character of the property. State tax returns The amount of deductible capital loss may be limited. State tax returns For more information, see Treatment of Capital Losses in Publication 544. State tax returns You cannot deduct any loss from abandonment of your home or other property held for personal use. State tax returns Example 1—abandonment of personal-use property securing nonrecourse debt. State tax returns In 2009, Timothy purchased a home for $200,000. State tax returns He borrowed the entire purchase price, for which he was not personally liable, and gave the bank a mortgage on the home. State tax returns In 2013, Timothy lost his job and was unable to continue making his mortgage loan payments. State tax returns Because his mortgage loan balance was $185,000 and the FMV of his home was only $150,000, Timothy decided to abandon his home by permanently moving out on August 1, 2013. State tax returns Because Timothy was not personally liable for the debt, the abandonment is treated as a sale or exchange of the home in tax year 2013. State tax returns Timothy's amount realized is $185,000 and his adjusted basis in the home is $200,000. State tax returns Timothy has a $15,000 nondeductible loss in tax year 2013. State tax returns (Had Timothy’s adjusted basis been less than the amount realized, Timothy would have had a gain that he would have to include in gross income. State tax returns ) The bank sells the house at a foreclosure sale in 2014. State tax returns Timothy has neither gain nor loss from the foreclosure sale. State tax returns Because he was not personally liable for the debt, he also has no cancellation of debt income. State tax returns Example 2—abandonment of business or investment property securing nonrecourse debt. State tax returns In 2009, Robert purchased business property for $200,000. State tax returns He borrowed the entire purchase price, for which he was not personally liable, and gave the lender a security interest in the property. State tax returns In 2013, Robert was unable to continue making his loan payments. State tax returns Because his loan balance was $185,000 and the FMV of the property was only $150,000, Robert decided to abandon the property on August 1, 2013. State tax returns Because Robert was not personally liable for the debt, the abandonment is treated as a sale or exchange of the property in tax year 2013. State tax returns Robert's amount realized is $185,000 and his adjusted basis in the property is $180,000 (as a result of $20,000 of depreciation deductions on the property). State tax returns Robert has a $5,000 gain in tax year 2013. State tax returns (Had Robert’s adjusted basis been greater than the amount realized, he would have had a deductible loss. State tax returns ) The lender sells the property at a foreclosure sale in 2014. State tax returns Robert has neither gain nor loss from the foreclosure sale. State tax returns Because he was not personally liable for the debt, he also has no cancellation of debt income. State tax returns Canceled debt. State tax returns    If the abandoned property secures a debt for which you are personally liable and the debt is canceled, you will realize ordinary income equal to the canceled debt. State tax returns This income is separate from any amount realized from abandonment of the property. State tax returns You must report this income on your return unless one of the exceptions or exclusions described in chapter 1 applies. State tax returns See chapter 1 for more details. State tax returns Forms 1099-A and 1099-C. State tax returns    In most cases, if you abandon real property (such as a home), intangible property, or tangible personal property held (wholly or partly) for use in a trade or business or for investment, that secures a loan and the lender knows the property has been abandoned, the lender should send you Form 1099-A showing information you need to figure your gain or loss from the abandonment. State tax returns Also, if your debt is canceled and the lender must file Form 1099-C, the lender can include the information about the abandonment on that form instead of on Form 1099-A. State tax returns The lender must file Form 1099-C and send you a copy if the amount of debt canceled is $600 or more and the lender is a financial institution, credit union, federal government agency, or any organization that has a significant trade or business of lending money. State tax returns For abandonments of property and debt cancellations occurring in 2013, these forms should be sent to you by January 31, 2014. State tax returns Prev  Up  Next   Home   More Online Publications